Pi Wars 2021 At home

Organizado por un equipo de voluntarios de Cambridge, Inglaterra

Pi Wars 2021 At home

Fecha: 10 y 11 de julio de 2021

Pi Wars es una competencia de robots “no destructivos” basados en el computador Raspberry Pi, en el cual se debe superar una serie de retos con un mismo robot, con posibilidad de cambiar únicamente un complemento del prototipo para adecuarse al reto.

Categorías:

  • Young Teams Novice: Equipos de sólo menores de edad sin experiencia en torneos y/o en desarrollo de prototipos con Raspberry Pi.
  • Young Teams Experienced: Equipos de sólo menores de edad con un mayor nivel de experiencia.
  • Beginner: Equipos que cuenten con, al menos, un miembro mayor de edad, sin experiencia en torneos y/o en desarrollo de prototipos con Raspberry Pi.
  • Intermediate: Equipos que cuenten con, al menos, un miembro mayor de edad, y tengan un nivel de experiencia intermedia.
  • Advanced: Los más “pro”.

La competencia fue realizada de forma virtual. Las inscripciones cerraron en el mes de octubre del 2020, los videos de los retos fueron enviados hasta el 24 de junio del 2021, y la publicación de los mejores videos y resultados fue realizada el 10 y 11 de julio del 2021.

Reglamento:

(Observación: Está en Inglés)

Team Rules

  1. Robots and teams will be allocated to one of the following categories:
    1. Young Teams – Novices.
    2. Young Teams – Experienced.
    3. Beginner adult/mixed teams.
    4. Intermediate adult/mixed teams.
    5. Advanced/Professional adult/mixed teams.
  2. Teams will be asked at the time of application into which category they should be entered. The final decision on categorisation rests with Pi Wars in consultation with the robot team.
  3. Any team comprised solely of members under 18 years of age must have a responsible adult allocated to the team (even if that person plays no active role in the team).
  4. Each team must build and program a single robot that handles all the challenges. This robot can have attachments, and parts can be exchanged, but must remain fundamentally the ‘same’ robot with the same core chassis. Please ensure that your recorded runs at challenges feature the same robot, fundamentally the same between challenges.
  5. Robots will compete and be ranked against other robots in the same category.
  6. There is no maximum size of team, however we have found that teams of more than 10 members can be difficult to co-ordinate.

Robot Rules

Raspberry Pi at the Core

  1. All robots must have an operational Raspberry Pi micro-computer (not micro-controller, such as the Pico) at their core which carries out the majority of the computing effort.
  2. You are allowed to enter one, single robot to the competition. You are not permitted to “swap out” the entire robot at any time, although you are permitted to swap out parts of your robot to compete in different challenges, such as motors and wheels, for example.
  3. Other boards, such as an Arduino, micro:bit, Raspberry Pi Pico or other microcontroller may be used on the robot but the Raspberry Pi micro-computer must be in overall control.
  4. Additional pieces of equipment e.g. a games controller, a laptop, mobile phone or tablet may be used to control the robot, but must not be physically attached when competing on the courses.

Power

  1. All robots must be powered by batteries (cables being very unwise on the courses!).
  2. If LiPo batteries are used, any charging must be done inside a fire-proof bag or box, available from many places that stock the batteries, such as HobbyKing. This is to ensure you don’t have any accidents.

Robot Types

  1. No airborne robots are permitted, e.g. drones.
  2. Walking and self-balancing robots are permitted.
  3. Hovercraft-style robots are allowed provided that the main fan is enclosed safely.

Size

  1. The main chassis (including wheels and protrusions) of competing robots must fit within a 225mm x 300mm x 370mm footprint, as in the Purple area in the diagram above:
    • The maximum width should be no more than 225mm.
    • The maximum length should be no more than 300mm.
    • The maximum height should be no more than 370mm.
  2. Attachments may be added to the robot for specific challenges. Any attachment can add additional length of 100mm and height of 80mm (as in the Green area in the diagram above) such that, when the attachment is at rest:
    • The maximum width should be no more than 225mm (i.e. no additional width).
    • The maximum length should be no more than 400mm.
    • The maximum height should be no more than 450mm.
  3. An attachment may be animated in some way such that it extends beyond the boundaries above into the “extension area”. However, the attachment must stay within a box 325mm wide by 500mm length (this is shown as the Pink area above).
  4. When adding attachments, the basic chassis, Raspberry Pi and controller arrangement must remain the same.

Smoke! Flames!

  1. Regardless of the theme for the current competition, the robot must not intentionally emit smoke or flames. This is to comply with Rule Zero: Do not be on fire.

Challenges

  1. There will be a number of different challenges into which you may enter your robot, the results of which will contribute to an overall score.
  2. Points structures will be published by Pi Wars to ensure that teams are aware of how many points each challenge is potentially worth. Generally, the maximum amount of points is the same per challenge but different choices that you make may restrict your team’s personal maximum.
  3. None of the challenges are mandatory.
  4. No points will be earned from challenges not entered.
  5. There may be some additional physical requirements for specific challenges – please consult the individual challenge pages for more information.
  6. To help us, you can optionally add a Timer Overlay to your video.

Submission of videos

  1. Pi Wars 2021 challenges can be attempted as many times as you wish.
  2. single video of your run for each challenge must be submitted as evidence. Details of what video needs to be submitted for each challenge can be found in the challenge rules. This can be done either as a link to an (unlisted) YouTube video or emailed as an MP4 to the competition organisers. For each challenge, you must submit a separate video.
  3. Each video should be a single “take” or continuous video – i.e. please do not edit together the “best bits”! The exception to this rule is for Artistic/Technical Merit where you can edit to your heart’s content.
  4. Please ensure that all submitted videos are suitable for public consumption. This includes ensuring there is no swearing or inappropriate behaviour present.
  5. Videos must be submitted no later than 12 noon on Thursday, 24th June (UK time). This is to enable us to edit them together for the live stream dates.

Premise

Your fish are starving! Shoot pellets of food into the bowl or roll balls of food into the base of the bowl to activate the auto-feeding mechanism.

Aim of the Challenge

To feed the fish with as much food as you can manage within the time limit.

Control Method

Remote control or Autonomous.

Time Limit

5 minutes.

Rules

  • The “fish bowl” can be imagined as two 200mm-dimension boxes, one on top of the other with two openings. See below for a 3D representation of what you will be constructing. You can construct it in one piece, or create two boxes. If you make the bowl out of multiple parts, please ensure they are glued or taped together for stability. We will provide, in the next week or so, a template for the fish bowl. In the meantime, here is the model shown in the video below (which was created using TinkerCad) in OBJSTL and GLTF formats. A laser-cuttable version of the fish-bowl/box is available from Open Pi Robotics on GitHub. Thanks to Brian Corteil for supplying it!

  • The bottom box will be open at the front. The top box will be open at the top but closed on the bottom, forming a 200mm cube with an open top.
  • The box will be placed in your 1500mm x 1500mm arena. A diagram for placement can be found below. You will want to think about how to fix it to the floor so that the ‘target’ maintains its position.
  • Your robot will be placed in the bottom left corner, facing the right side wall. You will need to maneuver into place for this challenge. There is a “Stop Line” marked on the diagram. Please use tape to mark it on the floor of your arena.

  • There are two methods for delivering the food.
    • The first, easier method, is to place five golf balls on the floor in specific positions (as shown above) and then nudge or push them forward so that they travel into the bottom boxOnce a ball enters the box, it is deemed as ‘delivered’. (This is to allow for floors which aren’t quite level and might roll the balls back out again!). You may use a mechanism to roll or push the balls forward. However, once the ball passes the Stop Line (see diagram), it must maintain contact with the floor.
    • The second, more difficult, method is to use a shooting mechanism to fire soft or lightweight projectiles into the top box. You will need to calculate the appropriate angle at which to fire the projectiles so that they land in the box. The projectiles must remain in the box (if they bounce out, the fish will go hungry!) but you can fire more than one at once if you feel that will give you greater accuracy. PLEASE be careful what you use for ammunition and how you fire them – expected volume is shown below but no projectile is safe at high speed!
  • Both methods can be done Autonomously or via Remote Control. However, you must specify which of the above methods, and which control method you are using. You cannot mix the four possible methods.
  • Whether you use the golf balls or the projectile method, you will have “five shots per round” and there will be three rounds.
  • At the end of each round, both the balls (if you’re using them) and your robot must be reset to their start positions.
  • If you are firing multiple projectiles at the same time, you are limited to a total of five projectiles each round. These projectiles must be separate, distinct shots. The gun below is an example of a shooting mechanism. If you figured out a way to trigger 5 barrels of the gun at the same time, that would be fine (as the projectiles are distinct). However, you would not be permitted to “tape together” the projectiles to make them ‘as one’.

  • Projectiles for the top box must be at least 4cmin volume (I think this is right – please contact us if you’re unsure if what you are using is appropriate!). This is to ensure fairness. Please ensure that the projectiles are visible on your video – even if this means that you do a shot of the box with the projectiles in to let us count them!
    • Nerf Rival balls are fine – they are 20mm in diameter.
    • Standard Nerf bullets are fine – they are 12mm in diameter and 72mm in length.
  • Golf balls go in the bottom opening, projectiles must go into the top opening.
  • Your top bowl may contain material to soften the landing of your projectiles. This material may be water, sand or foam, for example, which will provide a “soft landing”. However, the material may not be “attractive”, for example magnets or Velcro would not be allowed.
  • Please note: you must move your robot fully out of the starting box before you can shoot or move the golf balls.
  • Regardless of which method you use, no part of your robot should travel further forward than the Stop Line marked on the diagram. You should also be mindful of the overall size restrictions in the General Rules.
  • Reloading (if appropriate) and resetting the position of your robot between rounds should be done within the 5 minute time limit. In other words, do not stop the clock between rounds. You are allowed to reload on the way back to the starting box but you must return to the starting box in order to begin the next round.
  • Please record an uninterrupted video of your entire three sets of five shots to show that you have completed the challenge within the time limit.
  • Please do one of the following:
    • Count the number of balls of food that have been delivered successfully into the bottom box at the end of each round (remembering that if they roll out, they still count) and announce it clearly on the video at the end of each round. We will count as well, this is just to confirm.
    • Either of these two:
      • Count the number of pieces of food in the top bowl after each round and announce it clearly on the video.
      • Count the total number of pieces of food in the top bowl after all three rounds, if you are not emptying the fish bowl between rounds, and announce it clearly.

Ranking and Points

  • There are 3 rounds and 5 shots in each round, giving a maximum of 15 shot deliveries.
  • The points per each correct delivery of shot are as follows (and remember, you cannot mix these methods):
    • Autonomous, shot into the top box – 80 points.
    • Remote control, shot into the top box – 50 points.
    • Autonomous, rolled into the bottom box – 50 points.
    • Remote control, rolled into the bottom box – 30 points.
  • Rankings, which will be according to the Formula Scoring System, will be awarded according to the number of points scored on the food targeting challenge, split into the four different method/control method combinations.
    • In the event of a tie-break, the robot who manages to complete their 3 x 5 shots in the shorter time will rank higher. In the event of a time-and-points tie-break, the tie will be settled by artistic merit points (see below).
  • Up to 150 Artistic Merit points will be given for the decoration of your Fish Bowl.

Hints

  • Practice, practice, practice.
  • If using soft projectiles, it may be sensible to mark out a specific place in your arena that you will fire from – that way when you move from practicing to “real” operation, you will have a near-identical position.

Premise

You keep on tripping over toys that are strewn all over the floor. It’s time to get them organised!

Aim of the Challenge

To organise the toys into one of two arrangements, using one of two methods.

Control Method

Remote Control or Autonomous.

Time Limit

5 minutes.

Rules

  • Your robot will start facing the “bottom” wall and will need to turn around to face the blocks. If you are planning on mounting a “grabber” on the back of the robot, the front of the grabber should face the wall. You must have to turn around to face the blocks in their starting positions.
  • Your robot will need to move all of the blocks so that they are placed inside a target box (shown on the diagram) and so that they are ordered Red, Green, Blue in one of the following two ‘arrangements’:
    • Side by side with no more than 50mm between them.
    • One on top of the other with the Red block on the top, Green in the middle and Blue on the bottom. The stack can be anywhere within the target box.
  • You can place the blocks in either of the two arrangements by whichever method you wish: Remote control or Fully autonomous. Please do not mix methods as it will make it impossible to rank you.
  • You must state on your video which of these four options you are choosing:
    • Remote controlled, side-by-side.
    • Remote controlled, stacked.
    • Autonomous, side-by-side.
    • Autonomous, stacked.
  • You may run the course as many times as you wish but you should submit the video of your fastest run which should be completed in less than five minutes.
  • The colour of the cubes, whilst needing to be Red, Green and Blue, can be any shade of those colours that you choose.
  • You may place markers (such as QR codes) or coloured patches on or around the Target Box to aid navigation and placement of the blocks.

Ranking and Points

  • There are four possible method combinations as stated above.
  • For each block successfully placed into the target box, the following points will be awarded:
    • Remote control, side-by-side – 100 points.
    • Remote control, stacked – 200 points.
    • Autonomous, side-by-side – 150 points.
    • Autonomous, stacked – 300 points.
  • If all blocks are placed into the correct sequence (as specified above), the following points will be awarded:
    • Remote control, side-by-side – 100 points.
    • Remote control, stacked – 350 points.
    • Autonomous, side-by-side – 250 points.
    • Autonomous, stacked – 450 points.
  • Robots will be grouped together according to the four options above and then ranked according to the duration of their recorded run. Points will be awarded to the top ranked robots in each group according to the Formula Scoring System.

Penalties

  • You will be deducted 40 points each time your robot hits the arena side wall. (You are allowed to push the blocks against the wall without penalty).

Premise

Garden Gnomes have rearranged the path in your garden and you get lost every time you go out there! You must find the route to your shed to continue your Raspberry Pi adventures.

Aim of the Challenge

To complete the maze as fast as possible using one of the methods available.

Control Method

Remote control or Autonomous.

Time Limit

5 minutes.

Rules

  • The maze course will be provided to you electronically. It will fit within the 1500mm x 1500mm walled arena. It will be possible to print the course onto paper and measurements will be given if you wish to mark it out some other way (for example with 19mm electrical tape).
  • The colour of the course is up to you. For instance, if you already have a black floor, you can mark out the course with white tape. You could even have a green floor and mark out the course in red if you wanted to!
  • The red lines are to indicate the end of the six elements of the course (see the notes on points for how these are used). Anything in red should not be marked/printed – see the second version below:

  • Please note, especially, the start position marked with the small black mark and the size of the “shed”.
  • Roboteer Mark Mellors has created this highly-detailed technical drawing of the course. It clears up some of the measurements and flaws in the diagram above. We are happy, however, for your version of the course to be “approximately correct” as long as you make your best effort to recreate the overall shapes.
  • You can run the maze as many times as you wish. However, you should only submit the video of your fastest run, which will be used for ranking purposes, and that single run must be completed within the five minute time limit.
  • There are multiple ways of completing the course. You must choose only one method for your run. These are in order of difficulty:
    1. You can use only remote control to manually navigate the maze.
    2. You can use pre-programmed moves (aka dead reckoning) to navigate the maze autonomously on a pre-programmed route.
    3. You can use line following sensors to follow the course and autonomously navigate the correct path. You may optionally use audio commands to direct the robot should it need assistance at any point.
    4. You can use a camera attached to the core Raspberry Pi to follow the line autonomously using image recognition. Alternatively, you may use a camera to recognize shapes or markers on the walls of your arena in order to navigate. You may optionally use audio commands to direct the robot should it need assistance at any point.
    5. You can issue purely audio commands such that your robot listens and behaves accordingly. We suggest these instructions should be limited to simple commands such as “forward”, “back”, “left”, “right”, “stop” etc. You may use any method of getting audio commands to your robot, for example a paired Bluetooth headset or even just shouting the commands at your robot!
  • Each control method will be worth different amounts of points, depending on the complexity of the method.
  • A successful run requires staying over the path and not getting muddy feet. (i.e. your robot must keep to the line of the maze without wandering off!)
  • You must finish inside the “Shed” (marked on the course diagram). Timing of your run will finish when any part of your robot is inside the Shed.

Ranking and Points

  • Competitors will be ranked according to the single shortest time taken to drive the course across all their attempts. The robot with the shortest time will take first place. Points will be awarded according to the Formula Scoring System. Only robots completing the whole course will qualify for these ranking points.
  • For each of the six elements (marked in red in the above plan) passed by the entire chassis, you will be awarded points, dependent on the method chosen:
    • Completely remote control – 45 points.
    • Dead reckoning – 55 points.
    • Line following using line following sensors – 80 points.
    • Navigation using a camera – 150 points.
    • Audio commands only – 150 points.
  • Additional points for navigating the entire course, depending on the method chosen are as follows:
    • Completely remote control – 50 points.
    • Dead reckoning – 75 points.
    • Line following using line following sensors – 100 points.
    • Navigation using a camera – 200 points.
    • Audio commands only – 450 points.
  • If you use audio commands together with either the Line following method or Camera method, you will gain an additional 250 points. You must use at least three audio commands to score these points.

Penalties

  • If a rescue of your robot is necessary, place your robot back at the start of the course and try again as this will be classed as “getting muddy feet”. There is no penalty for resetting your robot as you will very likely not be submitted that video anyway.

Hints

  • Once you’ve chosen your method, stick to it.

Premise

Your robot must tackle the world of DIY on this create-your-own obstacle course.

Aim of the Challenge

To build an obstacle course with as much inventiveness as you can muster using DIY tools and other household objects and show that your robot can navigate its way around and return ‘home’ at the end.

Control Method

Remote control or Autonomous.

Time Limit

5 minutes.

Rules

  • You must construct your own obstacle course. It should feature the following:
    • Items of DIY equipment. (e.g. You could run your robot over a hammer, but this is just a simple example!)
    • Level changes (e.g. a ramp or lift)
    • Different terrain examples. (e.g. stones, sand).
  • Your obstacle course can use your entire location and is not limited in size to the normal 1500mm arena.
  • You may use as many obstacles as you wish on your course.
  • You are not limited to just DIY objects.
  • If you are running the course autonomously, you are permitted to place any markers you see fit in order to complete the course.
  • You are permitted to go outside your location (for instance into a garden or car park) if you would like to.
  • You must return (approximately) to your start point at the end of the run. (i.e. the course should return you to your ‘home’ position).
  • You should video-record your entire run for judging.

Ranking and Points

  • The merits of the courses and your run of that course will be judged by at least three independent Judges on the following criteria:
    • How imaginitive your obstacle course is – out of 100 points.
    • The complexity of your obstacle course – out of 200 points.
    • The amount of humour on display – out of 300 points. (Please make the Judges laugh – this is not an easy challenge to Judge!)
    • The agility of your robot – out of 200 points.
  • The following bonus points are also judged:
    • For remote control robots – the skill of the driver – out of 200 points.
    • For autonomous robots – the accuracy and maneuverability of the robot – out of 300 points.
  • Certain control methods gain additional bonus points:
    • Fully autonomous robots will be awarded a bonus of 400 points.
    • For remote-controlled robots, if audio commands are used as well, a bonus of 150 points will be awarded.

We recognise that many of these are entirely subjective criteria. We will have a panel of three Judges per challenge run so that the whole process is as fair as possible.

Penalties

  • None.

Normally, in a physical Pi Wars competition, we have a panel of Judges to whom you present your robot for Technical and Artistic Merit points. For Virtual Pi Wars 2020, we had the teams submit videos showing off their robots and explaining the features and design aspects. We have decided to continue along this theme for Pi Wars 2021.

For Technical and Artistic Merit points, you will need to submit a 3-5 minute video by 24th June featuring your robot. The following rules and guidance applies:

  1. One video per team can be submitted.
  2. The video should be between 3 and 5 minutes in length (this is to keep things manageable for the Judges).
  3. The video must be in English (our foreign language skills being a bit… lacking!)
  4. Your video can have mixed content – you can have slides, audio-only sections and full-on video.
  5. Your video should be in landscape format and as high resolution as you can make it. This helps the Judges be able to see things clearly.
  6. Robots can be shown moving or static.
  7. Your video must be submitted by Thursday, 24th June at 12 noon (UK time).
  8. The video must be available to our scoring Judges, but hidden from public view. You may, for instance, upload it to YouTube as an Unlisted video. All videos should be made available on the competition weekend (i.e. set to “Public”). Alternatively, they can be uploaded to a file sharing platform, such as Dropbox, and the Pi Wars team will upload them for you to the Pi Wars YouTube channel (this is the least preferred option due to the amount of time it takes to do so).
  9. You must notify Mike via mike@recantha.co.uk by the deadline, or preferably much sooner!

The panel of Judges will submit their scores before the competition dates.

Points

The maximum scores available for the Technical Merit and Artistic Merit challenges are 750 points each, giving a total of 1500 (which is equivalent to other challenges).

Aim of the challenge

  • Teams will blog about their experiences preparing for Pi Wars.
  • Here are some general Blogging guidelines to bear in mind when you take part in this challenge.

A note for 2020 competitors

Obviously, some of you will have blogged for the 2020 Disaster Zone competition. There will be some posts which do apply to the 2021 competition and some which do not. We recommend creating a new blog for 2021 and re-publishing the posts that do apply so that they are counted for 2021. We know this is a bit of a pain, but it’s the only way we can think of to make it make sense to the Judge(s).

Rules

  • You must use a blogging platform that enables the Judge to view the posts easily and without registering for the service that you use to host your blog! It must also be publicly available, rather than locked-down, so that others can view it.
    • There are many blog platforms out there that you can use, for example:
  • Blog URLs should be submitted as soon as possible after acceptance into the competition to mike@recantha.co.uk.
  • Although blog posts can be publicised over Facebook or Twitter, please note that Facebook, Twitter and Instagram will not be accepted as a blogging platform. Viewing things in the right order, and in full, is just too difficult through these platforms.
  • YouTube can be used for video posts. However, you must still post these to your blog so that everything is in “the same place”. Again, this is about keeping it simple for the Judge.
  • The deadline for blog posts is Friday, 2nd Julyat noon, UK time.

Ranking and points

Points will be awarded by an expert judge out of a maximum of 30. Only one team can be awarded the maximum points but below the maximum, some teams may receive the same points as another. Scores will be multiplied to give a maximum acquired total of 1500 points. This is equivalent to the other challenges.


Hints

  • The use of photographs and video is strongly encouraged.
  • Make sure to read the general Blogging guidelines as they give a lot of detail about what we’re looking for!

Resultados:

Puesto Equipo País Puntaje
1 Tiny Wonders India 4467
2 Talleres de Marquesina Puerto Rico 4458.5
3 Wroboteers Inglaterra 3706
4 BluBot Inglaterra 3624
5 Team CORTEX Inglaterra 3229
6 Bobik Estados Unidos 3203.5
7 Boxd Inglaterra 3159
8 TeamJRC Inglaterra 2624.5
9 Mediocrity At It’s Best Escocia 2535.5
10 Stonk Inglaterra 2451.5
11 RGS Robo Kai Inglaterra 2414.5
12 Magical Genius Inglaterra 2300
13 Leeds Raspberry Jam Inglaterra 1575
14 Z Bot 2 Escocia 965
15 Team Herlihy Irlanda 643
Puesto Equipo País Puntaje
1 STEV3 Irlanda del Norte 7197
2 Yo-Labs India 5564
3 Graveney School Robotics Inglaterra 4249
4 Team Argo Australia 3722.5
5 KES school Inglaterra 3266
Puesto Equipo País Puntaje
1 Flurybots Canadá 6147.5
2 Gremlin Inglaterra 5755
3 eFastus Inglaterra 5392
4 poli:droid Inglaterra 5180
5 The Barum Jam Collective Inglaterra 4427.5
6 Dan-ED Inglaterra 4225
7 Allwiya Kamay Perú 3935
8 Doing A Raspberry! Inglaterra 3427
9 Arbie Inglaterra 3144.5
10 Atahualpa Peruvian Team Perú 1957.5
Puesto Equipo País Puntaje
1 Nanny McPi Inglaterra 6832.5
2 RedBrick Inglaterra 5432.5
3 M.E.T. Martian Emergency Team Inglaterra 5319.5
4 Forest Fighters Inglaterra 5257.5
5 Dumont Cybernetics Inglaterra 4172.5
6 CNM HackerSpace Estados Unidos 4115
7 Jkpg Makers Suecia 3995
8 Pi-o-steer Inglaterra 2975
9 The Phoenix Ferret Inglaterra 2727
10 OrangeBot Italia 2482
11 Cambridge Team 1 Inglaterra 1692.5
Puesto Equipo País Puntaje
1 Team Dangle Inglaterra 6650
2 Tauradigm Inglaterra 6082.5
3 PiDrogen Inglaterra 5727
4 Night Fury Inglaterra 2795
5 Neave Engineering Inglaterra 1750
Puesto Young Novice Young Experienced Beginner Intermediate Advanced
1 Tiny Wonders STEV3 Gremlin M.E.T. Martian Emergency Team Team Dangle
2 Wroboteers Yo-Labs eFastus Nanny McPi PiDrogen
3 BluBot Graveney School Robotics Allwiya Kamay Forest Fighters Tauradigm
4 Boxd KES school Flurybots RedBrick Night Fury
5 Team CORTEX Team Argo poli:droid The Phoenix Ferret
6 Talleres de Marquesina Arbie CNM HackerSpace
7 Bobik Doing A Raspberry! Dumont Cybernetics
8 TeamJRC The Barum Jam Collective OrangeBot
9 Stonk Dan-ED Cambridge Team 1
10 Mediocrity At It’s Best
11 Magical Genius
12 RGS Robo Kai
Puesto Young Novice Young Experienced Beginner Intermediate Advanced
1 Team CORTEX Yo-Labs Flurybots RedBrick Team Dangle
2 Wroboteers STEV3 eFastus Forest Fighters Tauradigm
3 Mediocrity At It’s Best Team Argo poli:droid Nanny McPi PiDrogen
4 Talleres de Marquesina Graveney School Robotics The Barum Jam Collective CNM HackerSpace Night Fury
5 BluBot KES school Atahualpa Peruvian Team Jkpg Makers
6 Magical Genius Doing A Raspberry! Pi-o-steer
7 RGS Robo Kai Dan-ED M.E.T. Martian Emergency Team
8 Boxd Gremlin Cambridge Team 1
9 Stonk Arbie Dumont Cybernetics
10 Bobik Allwiya Kamay OrangeBot
11 Tiny Wonders
12 TeamJRC
13 Z Bot 2
Puesto Young Novice Young Experienced Beginner Intermediate Advanced
1 Talleres de Marquesina STEV3 Gremlin Nanny McPi Tauradigm
2 BluBot Graveney School Robotics eFastus CNM HackerSpace Team Dangle
3 Tiny Wonders Yo-Labs Flurybots RedBrick Night Fury
4 Z Bot 2 Team Argo poli:droid Pi-o-steer PiDrogen
5 Stonk KES school Dan-ED Dumont Cybernetics
6 Boxd Arbie Jkpg Makers
7 Bobik The Barum Jam Collective M.E.T. Martian Emergency Team
8 Wroboteers Doing A Raspberry! The Phoenix Ferret
9 Mediocrity At It’s Best Allwiya Kamay Forest Fighters
10 RGS Robo Kai Cambridge Team 1
11 TeamJRC OrangeBot
12 Team CORTEX
13 Magical Genius
Puesto Young Novice Young Experienced Beginner Intermediate Advanced
1 Wroboteers Graveney School Robotics Flurybots Jkpg Makers Team Dangle
2 Mediocrity At It’s Best STEV3 Gremlin Dumont Cybernetics PiDrogen
3 Magical Genius Yo-Labs poli:droid Nanny McPi Tauradigm
4 Bobik KES school Doing A Raspberry! RedBrick
5 Team CORTEX The Barum Jam Collective Forest Fighters
6 Tiny Wonders Allwiya Kamay M.E.T. Martian Emergency Team
7 Stonk Dan-ED The Phoenix Ferret
8 BluBot Arbie Cambridge Team 1
9 Talleres de Marquesina eFastus CNM HackerSpace
10 RGS Robo Kai OrangeBot
11 TeamJRC
12 Boxd
13 Team Herlihy
Puesto Young Teams Puesto Beginner – Intermediate – Advanced
1 STEV3 1 Nanny McPi
2 Talleres de Marquesina 2 Flurybots
3 Tiny Wonders 3 The Barum Jam Collective
4 KES school 4 Forest Fighters
5 Yo-Labs 4 PiDrogen
6 Team Argo 6 M.E.T. Martian Emergency Team
7 Wroboteers 6 Neave Engineering
8 Boxd 8 Gremlin
8 Leeds Raspberry Jam 8 Dumont Cybernetics
10 Mediocrity At It’s Best 10 Dan-ED
11 Bobik 11 Allwiya Kamay
12 Stonk 11 Tauradigm
13 poli:droid
13 CNM HackerSpace
15 Doing A Raspberry!
15 RedBrick
17 Arbie
17 OrangeBot
17 Pi-o-steer
20 The Phoenix Ferret
20 Team Dangle
Puesto Young Teams Puesto Beginner – Intermediate – Advanced
1 Leeds Raspberry Jam 1 The Barum Jam Collective
2 TeamJRC 2 Dan-ED
3 Bobik 2 Forest Fighters
3 STEV3 4 M.E.T. Martian Emergency Team
5 Talleres de Marquesina 4 Nanny McPi
6 Boxd 4 Team Dangle
7 Yo-Labs 7 RedBrick
7 Graveney School Robotics 7 Neave Engineering
9 RGS Robo Kai 9 Allwiya Kamay
9 Magical Genius 9 eFastus
11 Tiny Wonders 9 Flurybots
12 BluBot 9 Dumont Cybernetics
13 Stonk 13 Atahualpa Peruvian Team
13 Team Herlihy 13 poli:droid
15 Team CORTEX 13 PiDrogen
15 KES school 16 CNM HackerSpace
17 Team Argo 16 Pi-o-steer
18 Wroboteers 16 Tauradigm
19 Doing A Raspberry!
19 OrangeBot
21 Gremlin
21 Jkpg Makers
23 Arbie
23 The Phoenix Ferret
Puesto Young Teams Puesto Beginner – Intermediate – Advanced
1 Graveney School Robotics 1 Tauradigm
2 Bobik 2 poli:droid
2 Leeds Raspberry Jam 2 PiDrogen
2 STEV3 4 RedBrick
5 BluBot 4 Team Dangle
6 Yo-Labs 6 The Phoenix Ferret
6 Tiny Wonders 6 Neave Engineering
8 Team Argo 8 eFastus
8 TeamJRC 8 Dumont Cybernetics
10 Boxd (Bradford Grammar School) 8 M.E.T. Martian Emergency Team
10 RGS Robo Kai 8 Nanny McPi
12 Talleres de Marquesina 8 Pi-o-steer
12 KES school 8 Jkpg Makers
14 Team CORTEX 14 Gremlin
14 Stonk (Bradford Grammar School) 14 Dan-ED
14 Wroboteers (Wemms Education Centre) 14 OrangeBot
17 Team Herlihy 17 Forest Fighters
17 Magical Genius 18 Doing A Raspberry!
18 Allwiya Kamay
18 Arbie
21 Atahualpa Peruvian Team
22 Flurybots
22 CNM HackerSpace
24 The Barum Jam Collective

Videos de la Competencia (en Español):

Categoría: Young Teams Novice

Categoría Young Teams: Experienced

Categoría: Beginners

Categoría: Intermediate

Categoría: Advanced

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